Name: The Christopher Sargent School

Address: 160 Merrimack Street

Date: 1916

History: The Christopher Sargent School was built in 1916 to accommodate the growing school age population of Pleasant Valley. The school is identical to the Marsh Corner School. They were designed by James E. Allen of Lawrence who designed most of Methuen's schools, including the Sargent (1916), Marsh Corner (1917), Arlington (1910), Ashford (1913), Oakland Avenue (1910), Pleasant Valley (1914), Howe (1914), and Grosvenors (1917) Schools. Most of Allen's schools (Sargent, Marsh Corner, Oakland Avenue, Arlington, and Ashford Street) are brick structures with stone trim. They are similar in design, incorporating elements of the Colonial Revival and Craftsman styles. Grosvenor School is a single-story wood-frame structure, while the Howe and Pleasant Valley Schools are two and one-half story cement brick structures with more stylized detailing. In recent years, the Sargent School was converted to school administration offices and is now known as the Sargent Administration Building.






Name: James Frye House

Address: 176-178 Merrimack Street

Date: 1775

History: According to the previous inventory form, this farm house was built in 1775 by James Frye. By 1846 it was owned by Leverett Bradley. The map of 1884 identifies Mrs. L. Bradley as the owner. It was apparently no longer a working farm by 1914 for at that time the house was occupied by Ernest Barraclough, a mill operative. By 1918 it was the home of John Howarth, a laborer. It is not known exactly when the house was converted to a two-family dwelling but it was likely in the mid-20th century.






Name: Frank and Maria DeQuatro House

Address: 357 Merrimack Street

Date: c. 1910

History: According to directory research, it appears that this house was built for Frank and Maria DeQuatro around 1910. DeQuatro is listed in directories as a farmer. At the time it was constructed, the area had been fairly well developed with the various side streets near this intersection having been laid out. It appears that land on which this house was built was formerly part of the farm of S. Cross whose farm house used to stand just to the north. By the mid-1930s DeQuatro retired as a farmer and he continued to live here as late as the mid-1940s.






Name:

Address:459 Merrimack Street

Date: c. 1845 or 1850

History: This house is one of three in the immediate vicinity owned by Frederick Russell, a farmer, in 1884. In the 19th century, many of the houses in this area were owned by members of the Russell family. Based on the design of the house, it was probably built around 1845 or 1850. In 1846 Charles Russell owned a house in this vicinity that may have been this one. By 1914 the house at 459 was occupied by Frank W. Kimball, a teamster. Kimball remained here into the 1940s and by 1954 the house was occupied by Salvatore J. Borgesi who owned the house until at least 1978.






Name:

Address: 4-10 Morrison Court

Date: 1876

History: In 1874, John M. Graham bought land on Morrison Court from Daniel Morrison, who lived at 11 Park Street. Graham built a house in 1876 and according to the Methuen Transcript built a two story addition in 1880. An advertisement in the 1885 Directory indicates that Graham was a Carriage Manufacturer and Dealer with a shop nearby on Broadway. He was still listed in the 1901/2 Directory as living on Morrison Court, but at that time his shop was located behind what is now 215 Broadway.


According to an article in the Lawrence Eagle Tribune, before construction of Saint Monica's Rectory in 1922, priests from Saint Monica's lived for some time in the house at 4 Morrison Court.






Name: Carrozzi House

Address: 12 Morrison Court

Date: 1961

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 Morrison owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 12 Morrison Court was built in 1961 at a cost of $13,500 for Serafina R. Carrozzi.






Name:

Address: 16 Morrison Court

Date: 1961

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 16 Morrison Court was built in 1960 at a cost of $13,500 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 20-22 Morrison Court

Date: 1961

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 20-22 Morrison Court was built as a duplex in 1961 at a cost of $18,000 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 21 Morrison Court

Date: 1962

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 21 Morrison Court was built in 1962 at a cost of $14,000 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 24 Morrison Court

Date: 1961

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 24 Morrison Court was built in 1960 at a cost of $13,500 for Fred and Josephine Donnelley.






Name:

Address: 25 Morrison Court

Date: 1965

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 25 Morrison Court was built in 1965 at a cost of $13,000 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 28 Morrison Court

Date: 1963

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 28 Morrison Court was built in 1963 at a cost of $12,500 by Mr. Borysek. It was remodeled c. 1980s.






Name:

Address: 32 Morrison Court

Date: 1962/3

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 32 Morrison Court was built in 1962/3 at a cost of $14,000 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 36 Morrison Court

Date: 1962

History: In 1961 Henry P. Borysek (also spelled Boryseek) bought 2.79 acres of land from Ruth Morrison and laid out 9 house lots on Morrison Court. This property once belonged to Daniel Morrison who bought the land in about 1854. In 1861 he owned a house, which still stands at 11 Park Street, a barn and 11 acres of lands extending to Broadway. Morrison was a farmer, selectman, and member of the House of Representatives. In the 1870s and 80s, he sold some of his land and the 1884 map shows Morrison Court with several houses, only one of which, the John M. Graham house at 4-8 Morrison Court, remains.


The nine houses on Morrison Court were all built in the 1960s. The house at 36 Morrison Court was built in 1962 at a cost of $14,000 by Mr. Borysek.






Name:

Address: 1 Myona Street

Date: c. 1910

History: Myona Street was laid out in mid-20th century, therefore, the house formerly had a Merrimack Street address and the principal facade is the one facing Merrimack Street. According to research, the house was built about 1910 for Arthur W. Phippen, a carpenter and builder, and his wife Annie. Prior to building this house, he lived at 26 Merrimack Street, near the Lawrence border. By 1938 he had retired and was still living in the house. In more recent years (prior to 1978) the house was converted to multi-family use and is still occupied as such.






Name:

Address: 40 Myrtle Street

Date: c. 1794

History: This farm house was built in two primary phases. This earliest portion appears to date from ca. 1794 when the property was purchased by Reuben Boles. As late as 1884 there was only one other house on Myrtle Street, also owned by the Boles family. The house remained in the Boles family, being acquired by John Boles in 1810, until about 1830 when John Boles sold to Amos Morse. Morse sold the farm to Joseph Gardner in 1835. In turn, Gardner sold to Henry W. Currier in 1854. It is likely that either Gardner or Currier was responsible for construction of the southern portion of the house. The house remained in the Currier family until it was sold by Lucy Currier in 1909 to Alexander Corkum. By 1936 the house was owned by Emma Frankland who sold that year to Edith and Walter Fone.






Name: Captain Oliver Emerson

Address: 133 North Street

Date: 1775

History: The Emerson House is associated with Oliver Emerson, a locally prominent Revolutionary War Captain. The building is associated with Methuen's early development (pre-1850) when most of the town's population was dispersed along its network of country roads. The Emerson House meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 139 North Street

Date: c. 1808

Razed 2008

History: According to research conducted by the Methuen Historical Commission this farm house was built about 1808 for Day Emerson. By 1846 it had been acquired by Dean Emerson and by 1856 Gilbert Emerson was the owner. In 1878 Gilbert and Mary Emerson sold the property to Elijah Dunning who retained it until 1894 when he sold to William Frost. Frost is listed in town directories as a carpenter. From 1927 to 1945 the house was owned and occupied by James Dickinson, an electrician.






Name: Enoch Griffin House

Address: 51 North Lowell Street

Date: c. 1806

History: Called the Enoch Griffin House, 51 North Lowell Street was given a construction date of 1757 on the previous inventroy form, but documentation for this date has not been located. According to map and directory research, the house was occupied by various members of the Griffin family from as early as 1806 into the 1920s. By 1846, the owner was Amos Griffin. In 1872 and 1884, Enoch H. Griffin, a farmer, owned the house and was listed in the 1885 directory as living on North Lowell. From about 1901 to 1905, the only Griffin listed on the street was Amos, a farmer. By 1915, 51 North Lowell was occupied by Amos Griffin, a rural mail carrier. He lived there with his wife Katie at least until 1921, after which he may have moved to 16 Griffin Street, where Amos ( a milk dealer) and Katie Griffin were listed in 1923. Beginning about 1922 51 N. Lowell was occupied by Ruth and Albert Hill, a salesman, who in the 1940s was sales manager for J.W. Robinson Co., an automobile dealership in Lawrence. Ruth Hill lived at 51 N. Lowell until she died in the 1970s.






Name: Dennison farm

Address: 87 North Lowell Street

Date: c. 1750

History: It is believed that this house was built ca. 1750 by descendants of Major General Daniel Dennison whose house formerly stood on the site. Dennison received a grant of some five-hundred acres from the General Court in 1665. By 1717, the land had been divided among Dennison's descendants. What is now 87 North Lowell became known as the Dennison farm, and remained in the family (owned by descendants with the last names of Rogers and Wise) until the 1760s when it was acquired by Andrew Whittier. The Whittiers sold to William Bartlett in 1788, and the property subsequently became known as the Bartlett farm. In 1873, it was acquired by David Ayer, who held it until 1909, when he sold to John Breen. The house remained in the Breen family, which became the Deacy family by marriage, until 1954 when John J. Deacy sold it to Oscar R. Hoehn. In 1968, title passed to Rolland A. and Lillian Keyes.






Name: John Whittier House

Address: 125 North Lowell Street

Date: c. 1777.

History: Owned by the Whittier family since at least the mid-18th century, the land on which 125 North Lowell stands was conveyed by Andrew Whittier to his son John in 1769. John Whittier is believed to have built the present house c. 1777. A house was definitely present by 1801, when John's deed conveying a third of his land to Oliver Whittier described the property as a homestead farm. The farm remained in the Whittier family for well over one-hundred years. From at least the mid-19th to the early 20th century, it was the home of Ruth B. and Andrew J. Whittier, a stone mason and farmer. In 1918, William A. Clark, a farmer, and his wife Nellie purchased the house. In 1949, Clark's estate sold it to Russell, Paul and Louis Langevin. The Langevins owned the house until 1963 when it was purchased by William Leeburn, who appears to have lost it through foreclosure in 1965 when it was acquired by Alfred T. Waitt, Jr.






Name: Elmwood Cemetery

Address: 130 North Lowell Street

Date: 1772

History: According to a plaque at the entrance, Elmwood Cemetery was established in 1772. This could not be documented by map research because no cemetery was shown in the area on the 1806 atlas of Methuen. Owned by the Town of Methuen, the cemetery remains an active burial ground today. This is one of five adjacent burial grounds along both sides of N. Lowell Street, the other four of which are representative of the many ethnic groups that settled Methuen and nearby Lawrence including the Lithuanian, Lebanese, Polish, and Russian communities.






Name: Lebanese Cemetery

Address: North Lowell Street

Date: c. 1917

History: Established c. 1917, The Lebanese Cemetery is affiliated with St. Anthony's Church (Amesbury Street, Lawrence). The only cemetery in the state owned by the Maronite Catholic Rites Parish, it is an active burying ground. Father Bellamy, the first priest for the parish, is among the notable individuals from Methuen's Lebanese Community who are buried here. Six of the cemetery's acres are filled. An additional acre, which may have belonged to the adjacent Lithuanian National Catholic Cemetery, is now being developed for future burials. The former George Eaton's Grove, an intensely wooded piece of land abutting the cemetery to the west, was recently purchased by the Lebanese community for use as a park. This is one of five adjacent burial grounds along both sides of N. Lowell Street, four of which are representative of the many ethnic groups that settled Methuen and nearby Lawrence including the Lithuanian, Lebanese, Polish, and Russian communities.






Name: The Lithuanian National Catholic Cemetery

Address: North Lowell Street

Date: 1917

History: The Lithuanian National Catholic Cemetery, which has one of the largest concentrations of Lithuanian burials in Massachusetts, is owned by the Lithuanian National Catholic Church. The parish church, located at 150 Garden Street in Lawrence, was established on November 14, 1916. The Cemetery opened shortly thereafter in 1917 on land that had been a cow field. It was necessary for the parish to establish a cemetery as soon as possible because National Catholics can be buried neither in a Protestant cemetery because the ground is not consecrated, nor in a Roman Catholic cemetery because National Catholics do not recognize the authority of the Pope or Bishops. The cemetery wall is of the utmost importance to Lithuanian National Catholics, who believe it sanctions the grounds and that its stones must come from the land. The present wall was recently reconstructed and the arch was erected about four years ago. The cemetery is laid out in a cross-plan formed by north-south, east-west axes, and individuals are buried so that their feet will face east on Judgment Day. A significant member of the Lithuanian National Catholic community who is buried here is the priest, Father Gasparunas, who was renowned for his beautiful Lithuanian language skills. Their native tongue is extremely important to Lithuanians because use of it was denied to them by the Czars for over 150 years in Lithuania. This is one of five adjacent burial grounds along both sides of N. Lowell Street, four of which are representative of the many ethnic groups that settled Methuen and nearby Lawrence including the Lithuanian, Lebanese, Polish, and Russian communities.






Name: The Polish National Catholic Cemetery

Address: North Lowell Street

Date: 1928

History: Established in 1928 on land that was formerly a chicken farm, the Polish National Catholic Cemetery is owned by the Polish National Catholic Church, located at 112 Andover Street in Lawrence. It remains an active burial ground. This is one of five adjacent burial grounds along both sides of N. Lowell Street, four of which are representative of the many ethnic groups that settled Methuen and nearby Lawrence including the Lithuanian, Lebanese, Polish, and Russian communities.






Name: St. Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Cemetery

Address: North Lowell Street

Date: c.1914

History: St. Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Cemetery was originally established c.1914 under the auspices of St. Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Church formerly on Exchange Street in Lawrence. The Town of Methuen took over maintenance of the cemetery approximately fifteen years ago, after the Russian Orthodox Church was torn down due to a dwindling congregation. The Town installed roads and water lines, and then about six years ago, returned the cemetery to the Russian Orthodox Church, under the auspices of St. Xenia. A new church building has just been constructed on the cemetery grounds. This is one of five adjacent burial grounds along both sides of N. Lowell Street, four of which are representative of the many ethnic groups that settled Methuen and nearby Lawrence including the Lithuanian, Lebanese, Polish, and Russian communities.






Name:

Address: 238 North Lowell Street

Date: c. 1885

History: Stylistically, 238 North Lowell appears to have been built c. 1885. The first definitive directory listing for the house appears in 1914, when it was the residence of Edwin Richardson, a farmer, who lived there until about 1935. Richardson, who was listed on North Lowell Street (no street number) as early as 1901, had lived on Dracut Street in 1885. From the mid to late 1930s and until at least 1944, George D. Kenyon, a farmer, occupied the house.






Name: Emmanuel Primitive Methodist Church

Address: 105 Oakland Avenue

Date: 1904-5

History: 105 Oakland Avenue was built as the Emmanuel Primitive Methodist Church in 1904-5. It later became a chapel for that church, and has recently (April, 1996) become the Muslim Mosque. Funded by Edward F. Searles and costing approximately $100,000, the church was designed around a Skinner organ. In 1968, the concrete wings were added to provide a Sunday School and Fellowship hall.


The Primitive Methodist Society began in England in 1807 as a branch of Methodism. By about 1840, missionaries had established the group in America, and in the late-19th century, a woman by the name of Sharpe had organized the Methuen congregation, which began in a building located at 9 Center Street . Two years ago Emmanuel Primitive Methodist merged with St. George's Primitive Methodist (Arlington neighborhood) to form New Hope Primitive Methodist Church. The congregation, which is now worshipping at St. George's Church, has just sold the Oakland Avenue building and plans to sell St. George's in order to build a new church. Today it is an Islamic Mosque.






Name: The Oakland Avenue School

Address: 125 Oakland Avenue

Date: 1910

History: The Oakland Avenue School was built in 1910 to accommodate the growing school age population of this section of Methuen. It was designed by James E. Allen of Lawrence who designed most of Methuen's schools, including the Christopher Sargent (1916), Marsh Corner (1917), Arlington (1910), Ashford (1913), Oakland Avenue (1910), Pleasant Valley (1914), Howe (1914), and Grosvenors (1917) Schools. Most of Allen's schools (Sargent, Marsh Corner, Oakland Avenue, Arlington, Howe, Pleasant Valley, and Ashford Street) are brick structures with stone trim. They are similar in design, incorporating elements of the Colonial Revival and Craftsman styles. Grosvenor School is a single-story wood-frame structure. When constructed, the Oakland Avenue School contained eight classrooms with a seating capacity of 50 each.






Name: Corless Buildingg

Address: Lawrence Street also 1 Osgood St.

Date: 1886

History: Varnum Corliss (sometimes spelled Corless) built two buildings behind the James S. Dodge Store, one in 1882 and one in 1886. The first one, a wood frame building, was built for Corliss by Aaron Gilcreast and became the Pearson and Page Store, selling furniture and household goods. This building may be incorporated in the structure now covered in brick veneer. The second structure, begun in March of 1886, was described in the Methuen Transcript as being brick, with three stories on Osgood, St. and two on Lawrence Street. This building first appears on the 1892 Sanborn Insurance map.


Varnum Corliss was born in Haverhill West Parish in 1810. He came to Methuen as a young man and went into business as a harness maker in Wilson's block, formerly on Hampshire St. In 1835 he bought a building and land from Major Osgood's heirs on Broadway and fitted out a harness shop which he shared with Dearborn and Clark, early shoe manufacturers. He was also a carriage-maker and in the early days drove his carriages to Boston for shipment by packet to Maine where he sold to farmers there. Corliss later bought the so-called Bowen and Emerson tract of land at the corner of Broadway and Osgood St, where the bank building and post office is now located. His livery stable was located behind the Broadway buildings off Osgood Street. The buildings on the Lawrence St./Osgood St. site mentioned above appear to have been real estate investments. At one time, Corliss owned more than two acres in the heart of the village as well as more than 80 acres of farm land in Methuen and Salem.






Name: stone-arch bridge

Address: Osgood Street

Date: 1830s /1869/1876

History: Most of the early wooden bridges over the Spicket were replaced in the 1830s by stone arch bridges. On Osgood Street, the single arch bridge below the falls which was built in 1831, was rebuilt in 1869 and 1876.






Name: Lawrence Gas and Electric Company Building

Address: 2 Osgood Street

Date: c. 1920

History: The building at 2 Osgood Street appears on this site between 1919 and 1927. On the 1927 Sanborn Insurance map it is identified as a transformer building. Later assessors' records identify the building as a sub-station belonging to the Lawrence Gas and Electric Company. The building was remodeled in 1964 and 1970 when the addition was put on. The site is presently owned by the New England Rug Company. The electrical company associations are unique within the district.






Name: Roland's Woodworking Shop/ barber shop

Address: 28 Osgood St.

Date: 1963

History: This site was vacant in 1949. In 1960, Percy Nutton subdivided a large lot of land which he had owned for a number of years and sold this site, lot 26 A on the assessor's block plan, to Roland Mignault. Mignault received a permit to build a one story building at a cost of $8,000. In 1962, the directory lists Roland's Woodworking Shop at 28 Osgood. A barber shop had been there since 1966.






Name: Nutton Oil Company

Address: 28 Osgood St

Date: c. 1936

History: The Nutton Oil Company was first listed at 28 Osgood Street in 1936. Percy Nutton, the proprietor also owned the Lowell Street Garage and later a filling station at 276 Broadway. He lived at one time on Lowell Street, but his later residence was in Andover. In 1950 Nutton is also listed as the president of A. B. Worthen Company at 30 Osgood Street, which was originally the Methuen Company office and storehouse. The small brick office built c. 1936 is now on lot 26 B on the assessor's block plan.


In 1960 Nutton subdivided his property and sold the abutting lot (26 C) to Joseph Helbrick. Helbricks Auto Body shop is listed in the 1962 and 1972 Directory.






Name: Helbrick Auto Body Shop

Address: 28 Osgood Street

Date: c. 1960s

History: The Nutton Oil Company was first listed at 28 Osgood Street in 1936. Percy Nutton, the proprietor also owned the Lowell Street Garage and later a filling station at 276 Broadway. He lived at one time on Lowell Street, but his later residence was in Andover. In 1950 Nutton is also listed as the president of A. B. Worthen Company at 30 Osgood Street, which was originally the Methuen Company office and storehouse.


The small brick office built c. 1936 is now on lot 26 B on the assessor's block plan. In 1960 Nutton subdivided his property and sold the abutting lot (26 C) to Joseph Helbrick. Helbricks Auto Body shop is listed in the 1962 and 1972 Directory.






Name:

Address: 28 Osgood St. (rear)

Date: c. 1976-80/ 1990s rehab

History: In 1960 Percy Nutton subdivided part of his property (lot 26 on the assessor's block plan) into four lots all now called 28 Osgood Street. This site, (lot 26E) was sold in 1960 to Galloway Oil Company. Galloway had permits for an office and storage shed in 1976 costing $22,100. In 1980 Industrial Fence had a permit for unspecified work costing $30,000.






Name: Methuen Company Storehouse and Office

Address: 30 Osgood Street

Date: 1872-1880

History: Store house #1 of the Methuen Company was constructed in two parts. The earliest and largest section appears after 1872 and before 1884 and is labeled store house #1 on the 1896 atlas map. The second part, at the north end nearest to Osgood Street, is labeled office on the 1885 Sanborn Insurance map and 1896 county atlas. Construction of this section of the building, designed to be offices for the Methuen Company, was reported in the Methuen Transcript in 1880. It was described as being brick, two stories high, 40' x 24' and located at the north end of the storehouse. The architect was George Adams of Danvers and Lawrence.


The A. B. Worthen Company, plumbing suppliers were located in this building in the 1950s and 1960s and by 1950, Percy Nutton was listed as president of the company. Another business venture of Nutton's, the Nutton Oil Company was located in the small office building at 28 Osgood Street, in front of A. B. Worthen.


In the 1980s, the Methuen Company Office and Storehouse was the home of the Wolverine Manufacturing Company.






Name: Methuen Mills #4 Jute Mill

Address: 47 Osgood Street

Date: c.1870

History: Jute Mill #4 , located on the north side of the Spicket, was built in 1870. A covered walkway, built in 1883, connected it to mill #3 on the south side of the river (47 Osgood St). The building is now used for manufacturing by London Electronics and is painted white.


Two other, one story buildings, built in the late 1870s and shown on the 1885 Sanborn Insurance atlas were located to the east on what is now the parking area. These buildings can be seen on other Sanborn Insurance atlases and remained on the site as late as 1949.






Name: Methuen Co. Mills 1, 2, 3, 10, 11

Address: 47 Osgood Street

Date: 1826-82

History: According to an account published in the Methuen Transcript in October 1905 the first known reference to use of the falls was found in a deed belonging to David Nevins. The deed, from the widow of John Morrill, dated December 1709, conveyed to Robert Swan, for the sum of thirty pounds, one-forth of a saw mill and land "on Spicket river falls, the mill that was built by and belonged to and amongst Robert Swan, John Morrill and Elisha Davis." Two grist mill were built later. The first cotton mill, built by Stephen Minot, was constructed in 1814 and burned in 1818. In 1821 the land and water privileges were purchased by the Methuen Company, which built a new mill in 1826-1827, similar to those in Lowell. A lithograph "View of the Falls and Mills on the Spigot River, Methuen, Mass." shows the Methuen Company buildings c1836-37.


The Methuen Company was acquired by Boston investor, David Nevins in 1864. Under Nevins, who also owned the Pemberton Mill in Lawrence and mills in Salem and Webster, the Methuen Company quadrupled in size between 1870 and 1881, producing cotton duck, cotton flannel, tickings, awnings, and jute bags. Drawings and plans showing the Methuen Company in 1877 can be found in the Barlow Insurance Survey of that year. Increases in production required additional water power and in 1880, the old wooden dam was replaced by a new dam built of granite from Nevins' Salem, N.H. quarry (Lowell St). The Methuen Company remained in business into the twentieth century and was for a time part of the Arlington Mills (NR). By the 1930s, the buildings were rented for other industrial uses. The Inventory of Historic Engineering and Industrial Sites states that the Methuen Mills complex is one of the best preserved textile mill sites in the lower Merrimack Valley.






Name:

Address: 58 Osgood Street

Date: c. 1846

History: A house appears approximately on this site on the 1846 Barker map, but it can not be verified. The form of the house clearly indicates a date of c1800 however. In 1872, the house was owned by David Nevins and in 1884 and 1896 by the Methuen Company. It was presumably used for mill housing. The 1901/2 Directory, which is the first to give a street listing, does not list number 58 Osgood Street. The building is presently used as a restaurant and bar. Despite extensive alterations, it is one of the earliest buildings remaining in central Methuen.






Name: Methuen Mills Storehse.

Address: 62 Osgood Street

Date: c. 1850

History: The description of the Methuen Company in the Inventory of Historic Engineering states that the brick storehouse (62 Osgood Street) located next to the railroad tracks was probably built around 1850, about the time that the railroad was constructed in 1848-49. Since neither the railroad nor the store house appear on the 1846 map, this appears to be an appropriate conclusion. The building is similar to storehouses built at Lowell and Lawrence in the years 1830 to 1850. It does appear on the 1853 Essex County Map.




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