Name: Mann House

Address: 9 Park Street

Date: 1876

History: According to the assessor's records, the house at 9 Park Street was built in 1876. At that time it was valued at $950. The first owner was John W. Mann, who is listed in the 1885 Directory and whose firm Tompkins and Mann at 191 Essex Street in Lawrence sold paint and oil. Mrs. Mann was still living in the family homestead in 1906. Among its early owners was Elizabeth Mann, A music teacher.


A notice in the Methuen Transcript says local builder Albert Fales built an addition in 1880.


This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: E.M. Clark House

Address: 10 Park Street

Date: c 1880

History: This building is a well preserved Italianate style house, associated with the development of Methuen during the post-war expansion of the local mills and the nearby Lawrence area. E. M . Clark, an early resident, listed his occupation as a shoe manufacturer.


This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.







Name: Phillips/ Morrison House

Address: 11 Park Street

Date: c 1830

History: The first legible record of this house is in 1832, when George A. Waldo sold 1 acre of land with a building to Joseph S. Morse, which Morse in turn sold to the Rev. Phillips in 1840 (earlier deeds existed but were unreadable). This is confirmed by William Barnes, whose reminiscences were reported in the Methuen Transcript. Barnes said that when he came to Methuen in 1845 this was the home of the Reverend John C. Philips, minister of the First Congregational Church. In 1853, Philips sold the house and 11 acres of land to Daniel Morrison (475/113). Morrison, who came to Methuen in 1840, celebrated his 85th birthday in that house in 1905. He was a farmer, undertaker, selectman, member of the House of Representatives, a member of the Hope Lodge I.O.O.F., and highly respected member of the community. Morrison Court is named for him.






Name: Rollins House

Address: 12 Park Street

Date: 1870

History: Amos Rollins, shoe maker, is listed in the 1860 Directory as living on Main (Broadway) and the 1872 map shows that his property stretched back to Park Street. In 1870, Rollins was assessed for a small house on a back lot, presumably 12 Park Street. Although Rollins later moved to a new house on Vine Street, he retained the Broadway/Park Street property. Eventually, Edward F. Searles acquired Rollins' Broadway/Park Street property and in 1909 sold 12 Park Street to Miss Fernette Frederick.






Name: The Currier/Clough House

Address:14 Park Street

Date: c.1870

History: According to William Barnes, whose reminiscences appeared in the Methuen Transcript (1905), there was a house at 14 Park Street in 1845 when he came to Methuen. That house belonged to Daniel Currier, and in later years to Mrs. Cluff, widow of John Cluff who had worked in the cotton mill.


Assessor's records show that John Cluff actually acquired the house from Mary Gustine in 1873. In 1879, the Methuen Transcript reported that local builder Jesse Towns was putting a second story on John Cluff's house. This is confirmed by the assessor's records for 1879 which indicate the second story was used as a store.






Name: The Henry Preston House

Address: 15-19 Park Street

Date: mid-1840

History: According to William Barnes reminiscences in the Methuen Transcript (1905), in the mid-1840s 15-19 Park Street was a one story house belonging to Henry Preston who had a wheelwright shop next door. (It is not known when the second story was added.) Assessor's records indicate that in the 1850s, the house belonged to Enoch A. Merrill, and in 1875 the estate of Enoch A. Merrill was taxed to Joel Foster. The barn, which still exists, appears of the map between 1872 and 1884. Foster, who owned other farm sites in Methuen, was named the leading farmer in Essex County in 1884.


This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: The First Baptist Church

Address: 30 Park Street

Date: January 1870

History: The First Baptist Church was formed on March 1, 1815 with thirteen members, five men and eight women. Services were held in the Daniel Frye house and in an old meeting house which was enlarged twice. In 1840 they built a church on this site which burned in 1869. The present church was built the same year and dedicated in January 1870. The bell, which was cast in Baltimore and weighed 1600 lb was installed in 1878.


A photograph c. 1900 at the Methuen Historical Society shows an interior view of the church and an undated drawing shows exterior details, and horse sheds behind the church.


Reverend S. L. B. Chase was pastor of the church in 1885 when the membership stood at 218. Chase was succeeded by Reverend Nathan Bailey.






Name: First Baptist Church Parsonage

Address: 32 Park Street

Date: 1877

History: The Parsonage at 32 Park Street was given to the church by Charles Ingalls a staunch supporter and life long member of the church. The house was built in 1877 and Ingalls paid taxes on it at least until his death in 1882. A committee had been appointed in 1878 to acknowledge Ingalls' gift of the parsonage, but their charge was not fulfilled until 1883. In 1885, Rev. Chase lived in the parsonage, and in 1896 and 1901/2, the Rev. Bailey was living there.






Name: J. Haskell Gordon House

Address: 36 Park Street

Date: 1873

History: According to the assessor's records the house at 36 Park Street was built in 1873 and taxed to J. Haskell Gordon. Gordon's occupation is unknown. In 1882 the property was sold to M. H. Fletcher of Lowell and in 1899 , Fletcher (still in Lowell) sold to J. G. Frederick and George G. Frederick. In 1905, the Methuen Transcript reported a serious fire at the home of George G. Frederick which damaged the barn and ell of the house.






Name: Stairway

Address: Park Street

Date: 1880

History: It is believed that this stairway was constructed c1880 by Charles Tenney at about the time that the Civil War Memorial and Park (#905) were created. They lead from the gatehouse (#60) to his estate (Area G) to the park. According to local assessors' records they were owned by B. Allen Rowland, Searles’ heir, c1940. They were later owned by Daniel G. Tenney, whose widow Marguerite sold them to Howard Freedman who owned the Red Tavern (#53). Freedman sold them to the First Church Congregational (#58) in 1961.






Name: Spinning Mill

Address: 29-31 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1810

History: The wood-frame structure at 29-31 Pelham Street is believed to have been a former spinning mill building that stood on the site of the Methuen Mills complex off Osgood Street. It was moved to this location in 1826 when a larger cotton mill was constructed in its place and ultimately converted to a two-family residence. Along with the "A" Mill of the Methuen Woolen Company, 29-31 Pelham Street remains one of the earliest industrial buildings in town. As early as 1856 this house, along with five adjacent buildings were owned by Albert S. Fales, a carpenter who had a shop in one of the nearby buildings. This house remained in the Fales family until 1905 when it was acquired by Eliza E. Dudley.






Name:

Address: 33-35 Pelham Street

Date: c.1818

History: Built c.1818 probably as a single, 33-35 Pelham was converted to a two-family house after 1906. In 1806, a house in the general area was owned by Sargent. By 1846, the owner was S. Barker. In 1872, the house was one of five contiguous buildings owned by Albert S. Fales, a carpenter who had his home on Pelham. Fales may have lived one door to the west in the house at the corner of Pelham Avenue, since that house had a carpenter shop attached to its northeast corner. By 1906, A.S. Blodgett owned what was then 17 Pelham. The block was renumbered c. 1924.






Name:

Address: 50 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1875

History: 50 Pelham Street is significant as a well preserved house associated with the workers at the Methuen Cotton Mills and other Spicket River factories.

This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 68 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1900

History: 68 Pelham Street together with the house at the rear of the lot, were constructed about 1900, probably by Charles Hutchins, a carpenter and builder. Research on the house is complicated because Pelham Street was renumbered c. 1924. Charles Hutchins started his carpentry business in 1885 and had his home and business at 32 Pelham Street by 1905. By 1914, his address had changed to 38 Pelham, which had become 68 Pelham Street by 1924. Charles died between 1930 and 1936, when 68 Pelham Street was the residence of Alice D. Hutchins, widow of Charles.






Name:

Address: 114 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1880

History: 114 Pelham appears to have been built c. 1880. By 1884, it was owned by Mrs. Margaret Bagnell, who lived there with John T. Bagnell , a hat maker, and William Bagnell, a wood turner. By 1901, Mrs. Bagnell was a widow (of William), and by 1906 the house was owned by her estate. William A. Bagnell (wood turner) and Minnie E. Bagnell (dressmaker), who had lived in the house with Mrs. Bagnell before she died, continued to reside there. The house remained in the Bagnell family until at least 1950 when it was the residence of Mary E. Bagnell. The street number changed from 58 Pelham to 114 Pelham c. 1924.






Name:

Address: 125- 127 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1890

History: Originally numbered 65-67 Pelham Street, 125-127 Pelham was built c. 1890 as a double house. (This section of Pelham Street was renumbered c. 1924.) The first owner appears to have been Maurice Flahive, a watchman, who lived here by 1900, having lived on Broadway in 1885. Maurice died between 1926 and 1936, but the Flahive family continued to live in the house until at least 1936, when it was the residence of Catherine (or Katherine) Flahive and Franklin M. Flahive, a mill worker, who roomed here. Robert Jamieson, who worked at Arlington Mills, lived at number 67 in 1901 and 1904.






Name:

Address: 193 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1800

History: Deed research done by the Methuen Historical Commission suggests that 193 Pelham Street was built c. 1800 by either Joseph or Benjamin Osgood. In 1799, the land, apparently with no dwelling, was conveyed to Jonathan Merrill and Benjamin Osgood by Amos Barker. The next conveyance occurred in 1829, when Joseph Osgood sold the house to Benjamin Webster. 193 Pelham Street remained in the Webster family for over one-hundred years until it was sold in 1944 through the estate of Flora E. Webster to Walter A. Colher . The Colher family owned the property until 1968, when it was sold to Fred and Shirley Wallace.






Name:

Address: 207 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1806

History: The 1806 map of Methuen shows a house owned by Hibbard in the vicinity of 207 Pelham Street. From 1846 to at least 1900 the house was owned by Asa Harris. As early as 1885, the house was occupied by Albert Harris, a farmer and wood dealer. (Unlike the lower numbered addresses on the street, the 200 block of Pelham does not seem to have been renumbered in the 20th century.) In 1896, the only Harris on the street was Henry C., a hairdresser, whose specific address was not given. In 1901, 207 Pelham was the residence of Frank E. Cooney, a farmer, who was still there in 1905. By 1914, Thomas Haigh, a laborer, and Joseph Sicotte, a watchman occupied the house. Sicotte, who became a paper maker and then an operative, remained there until at least 1917. In 1921, 207 Pelham was the residence of Florence and Charles Trussell who lived there until at least 1944. Trussell was a sheet metal worker, then an operative, and later a town employee. From at least 1925, the Trussells shared the house with Margaret and Otis N. Trussell, a grocer, who probably had his business next door in what is now a variety store. By 1946, Charles and Florence Trussell had moved to 198 Pelham, and Albert Reinhold, who ran Reinhold's Variety store lived at 207. In 1972, the Reinholds were still living in the house, but another party appears to have been operating the store.






Name: Eliphalet Bodwell House

Address: 231 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1770

History: Based on deeds researched by the Methuen Historical Commission, 231 Pelham appears to have been built c. 1770 for Eliphalet Bodwell. In 1778, Bodwell sold the property, apparently with a house, to Daniel Hibbard. The house was certainly there by 1806, when it is shown on the town map owned by Hibbard; the Hibbard family owned three other houses nearby. 231 Pelham remained in the Hibbard family until 1817, when Simon Hibbard sold it to Asa Palmer. Palmer kept it only three years, selling it in 1820 to Herman Harris, along with an additional parcel of land on the other side of the street. Harris's heir, Abner Stevens, sold it to Rebecca Harris in the 1840s. In 1860, it passed from Asa Harris (who also owned 207 Pelham) to Walter Stevens, who served several terms as a Methuen road commissioner. The 1885 city directory lists the address as the residence of Abner Stevens (who was then 83 years old), Mrs. A. Janet Stevens, and George F. Stevens (a farmer). The house remained in the Stevens family until 1945, passing to Walter's son Charles A. (farmer and milk dealer) and then to Charles's wife, Cora A. Stevens, who sold it to Walter Colher. The Colhers and their descendants (Bryce Colher to Winnifred M. Colher to Robert L. and Charlotte O. Colher) owned the house until 1970 when Leo and Jean A. Robillard Jr. purchased it.






Name:

Address: 237 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1915.

History: It appears that 237 Pelham was built c. 1915. The earliest occupant to be identified is Wesley L. Messer, a laborer, who lived here by 1918. By 1925 and until at least 1938, Gordon N. Cossar, a laborer, occupied the house.






Name:

Address: 262-264 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1920

History: 262-264 Pelham Street is significant as a well preserved example of the use of concrete products in residential construction and is associated with Methuen's major period of redidential development in the early 20th century. This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: Moses Morse House

Address: 311 Pelham Street

Date: 1762

History: The Moses Morse House is an early farmstead representative of the development of 18th century architecture in rural Methuen. Such dwellings were constructed by farmers such as Moses Morse who sold their produce to markets in Salem and Newburyport, and later Lowell and Lawrence. This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 315 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1850

History: According to the previous inventory form, a portion of this building was originally a school (probably a mid-19th century wood-frame one-room school) which was purchased from the town in 1875 an moved to this site. It was used as a Sunday School by the Methodist Church until 1910. The building was vacant from 1910 until 1913. It was then taken over by the Marsh Corner Union Sunday School Society who began holding services in the former school in 1922. In 1924 the building took on its present appearance when the building was raised, a new cellar added, and the entry portico built. The existing fabric and appearance date largely to 1924 when it was redesigned as the Marsh Corner Community Church by Lawrence architect T.E. Martin.






Name:

Address: 349 Pelham Street

Date: pre-1846

History: The first owner of 349 Pelham Street (situated at the fork of Salem and Pelham) that can be identified from city maps is Joseph Emerson recorded on the 1846 atlas. The property remained in the Emerson family until at least 1912, being the residence of Millard F. Emerson in 1885. Emerson manufactured and sold lumber and cider. Lumber may have been a family business going back several generations, since a saw mill was erected across Salem Street from the house between 1846 and 1856. By 1896, Millard Emerson ran a cider mill and was sharing the house with Samuel Emerson, a milk dealer. In 1912, Millard and Samuel Emerson conveyed the house to Maude Bradstreet and Clara J. Emerson. Thereafter, title passed from Bradstreet to Gloddy to Fuller to John G. and Irene Vater, who owned it from 1938 to 1970.






Name: The Town Infirmary

Address: 423 Pelham Street

Date: 1934

History: The Town Infirmary was constructed in 1934 to replace the overcrowded Poor Farm on the opposite side of the street. The first residents were transferred in October of 1935. Prior to that they had occupied all floors of the Poor Farm even though the third floor was unheated. The exterior of the infirmary has been altered very little from its original design although it was converted to use as apartments in the 1960s.






Name: Old Town Farm

Address: 430 Pelham Street

Date: c. 1845

History: The "Town Poor Farm" was Methuen's second. Its construction was necessitated by the incorporation of Lawrence in 1845 from lands formerly belonging to Methuen; the original poor farm was lost to Lawrence. Town records do not indicate the architect; the other important building of the period built by the town was the 1853 Town Hall, a structure which was to provide housing for the town's indegent, among other functions. The end-wall treatment is not seen elsewhere in Methuen.


The Town Poor Farm building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship. It is significant as an early and unusual Town building and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 1 Pine Street

Date: built (c. 1870s - after 1872)

History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved (see forms for 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street and 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street). The store front on 1 Pine Street was added between 1919 and 1927.






Name: Red Tavern

Address: 5 Pleasant Street

Date: 1900

History: In 1897, Edward F. Searles acquired the property of S. Q. Hersey including the Exchange Hotel on Broadway, the adjoining hotel livery stable, and a house facing on Pleasant Street. In 1900 he created a private guest house called the Red Tavern, which is said to have been made up out of several earlier houses. This reworking and moving of existing buildings was a common practice of Searles and his architect, Henry Vaughan who was responsible for the renovations. In 1909 the Methuen Transcript reported that the Red Tavern had recently been opened to the public, providing English style accommodations. It was run for Searles by Carrie Barnes, his house keeper for many years. According to Smith B. Williams, Searles left the Red Tavern to Mrs. Barnes in his will.

The Red Tavern was purchased by Howard Freedman in 1946, who made several additions. According to advertising material from that period, the Red Tavern had 21 rooms, many of which were panelled in oak or walnut. Several rooms had large fire places and the decor continued to reflect an English theme.






Name: Rolf C. Norris House

Address: 9 Pleasant Street

Date: 1924

History: The present house at 9 Pleasant Street replaces a nineteenth century dwelling which was torn down before 1906, possibly in conjunction with Edward F. Searles manipulation of buildings in the area and construction of the adjacent Red Tavern.


The house was built in 1924, by Rolf C. Norris, on land bought the previous year from Helen K. McLanathan. Norris, a physician, and his wife Margaret, had previously lived at 247 Broadway. He kept his office on Broadway after moving to Pleasant Street.






Name: Gutterson/Peirce House

Address: 13 Pleasant Street

Date: c. 1845

History: This house was part of the early residential expansion of Methuen center. Assessors' records and town directories indicate that it was constructed c1845 by Branch G. Gutterson, a local grocer. Gutterson is indicated as the owner on the 1872 and 1884 atlases, while the estate of A.K. Gile is the owner by the time the 1896 atlas was published. Assessors' records indicate that the property was sold to Ella A. Peirce in 1888, along with the adjacent (E) Merrill lot (see 15 Pleasant Street). It appears likely that either Peirce or Gile added the verandah and new window sash.






Name: Peirce House

Address: 15 Pleasant Street

Date: 1889-90

History: This house was built in 1889-90 by Dr. James and Ella Peirce, who previously lived at 7 Pleasant Street (no longer extant; site of Red Tavern). The architect was George G. Adams of Lawrence and Danvers, and the original drawings are preserved at the SPNEA archives. James Peirce was a local physician who maintained an office in his home; Dr. Peirce is indicated as the owner on the 1896 atlas. The house was inherited by James and Ella's son Albion G. Peirce who lived in the house until he died in the 1960s. Albion was a substantial citizen who was noted as a trial justice and lawyer in the 1925 town directory, and as the president of the Methuen National Bank in 1950.






Name: The First Congregational Church

Address: 26 Pleasant Street

Date: September 1881

History: In 1880, the Methuen Transcript reported that architect C. W. Damon of Haverhill completed plans for the Congregational Vestry (Phillips Chapel), which was to be built of stone, 30 x 73 feet. While the new building was under construction, the old one was to remain in use. It was moved to a vacant site in front and later to a site on Railroad Street owned by David Nevins. The old vestry was used for a few years as a Mission School.


C. Willis Damon, was born in Pawtucket, R.I. and died in Haverhill in 1916. He was a graduate of M.I. T. and taught drawing in the Boston Public Schools before joining his brother Charles Page Damon to form the firm of Damon Brothers. C. Wills Damon seems to be the better known of the two and is credited with design of the Haverhill City Hall, Portsmouth Court House and Tilton Seminary in New Hampshire. Locally he was responsible for the Phillips Vestry of the First Congregational Church, a house for Daniel W. Tenney at the corner of Broadway and Pleasant Street, the Tenney Stock Stable and renovations to the Tenney Gate House.


Local carpenter, Jesse A. Towne did the carpentry work and a new Sanborn furnace, made locally was installed to heat the building.


The cornerstone was laid in September 1881 without ceremony. In May 13, 1882 the Rev. J. H. Selden was ordained in the church. The Transcript story of the ordination was accompanied by a cut of the church which showed the old vestry.






Name: Charles H Tenney Estate

Address: Pleasant Street

Date: 1830-1892

History: Charles H. Tenney, son of John Ferguson Tenney and Hannah Woodbury, was born in 1842 in Salem, New Hampshire. He was the youngest of four sons, the others being J. Milton, Daniel, and George. The family later came to Methuen where John F. Tenney had a grocery and hardware store on Hampshire Street, as advertised in the 1860 Directory. Sons George and Daniel opened Tenney & Company shoe manufacturers at 2 Charles Street (see form) in 1865, and in 1868 Charles, with his brother J. Milton, opened C. H. Tenney & Company hat factory on Broadway on the site of the Selden Worsted Mills (225 Broadway). In 1883 Charles sold his interest in the local hat company to J. Milton and went to New York. According to the Methuen Transcript, Tenney opened offices in New York and established himself as a wholesale commission agent, handling a very large part of the hat production in the U.S., and selling more than any similar concern in the world.


Even after moving to New York, Mr. and Mrs. Tenney retained their ties with Methuen, returning to build a magnificent summer home, "Grey Court" on the top of what had previously been known as Jones Hill. Tenney hired landscape architect Ernest W. Bowditch, who was responsible for the layout of Tuxedo Park in New York, to develop a plan for the estate. He also employed a Mr. Gall as gardener (2 Highland Ave). In 1882, Tenney began surveying the hill lot, building walls, and opening roads. In April 1882 he purchased the Whittier house which was remodeled by Haverhill architect, Mr. Damon, as a gate house (37 Pleasant St). In the next several years, the roads were macadamized, ponds built, and ornamental trees planted. Additional property was acquired for the estate, which eventually totaled 75 acres, and on completion there were two miles of avenues. The name Fair View Park was chosen for the Tenney property in 1887. One of only two extant buildings on the Tenney estate is the stock stable, built in 1884 and shown in the Methuen Transcript January 3, 1885. An extensive description of the layout of the building, its fine interior finish, and the "tally-ho" drive up to the front entrance can be found in this article. The building was designed by the Damon Brothers, architects of Haverhill. C. Willis Damon, was born in Pawtucket, R.I. and died in Haverhill in 1916. He was a graduate of M.I. T. and taught drawing in the Boston Public Schools before joining his brother Charles Page Damon to form the firm of Damon Brothers. C. Wills Damon seems to be the better known of the two and is credited with design of the Haverhill City Hall, Portsmouth Court House and Tilton Seminary in New Hampshire. Locally he was responsible for the Phillips Vestry of the First Congregational Church and a house for Daniel W. Tenney at the corner of Broadway and Pleasant Street. Damon also remodeled the Whittier House, a handsome granite farmhouse, for reuse as the estate gate house. This building is in the process of restoration, and remains as the only intact building on the estate.

Grey Court, begun in 1890 and completed three years later, was designed by the well-known New York firm of Carrere and Hastings. It overlooked the town of Methuen until it was destroyed by arson in 1978. Although the burned out shell was for the most part demolished in 1985, its few remaining ruins are indicative of the elegance and fine material of the original house. In 1951, the Tenney family gave 26 acres of the estate to the town for the Tenney High School and sold the rest of the site to the Basilican Salvatorian Order of the Melkite Rite, putting the money in trust for Tenney High School graduates. St. Basil's Seminary and Chapel was built in 1960 at a cost of $275,000 and the Tenney stable was remodeled beginning in 1966.






Name: Tenney Gatehouse

Address: 37 Pleasant Street

Date: 1830/1883

History: According to Ernest Mack, of the Methuen Historical Commission, the house at 37 Pleasant Street was built by Richard Whittier (brother of Ebenezer Whittier) between August and November of 1830. Originally a rough stone farm house, the building was purchased in April 1882 by Charles H. Tenney, who converted it to the elegant gate house which is presently being restored by the Tenney Gate House Assoc.


The Methuen Transcript reported on September 1, 1883 that the veneer of cut stone, a tower, and other Queen Anne style features were being added. Architect C. Willis Damon, who also designed the Stock Stable for Charles Tenney, was born in Pawtucket, R.I. and died in Haverhill in 1916. He was a graduate of M.I. T. and taught drawing in the Boston Public Schools before joining his brother Charles Page Damon to form the firm of Damon Brothers. C. Wills Damon seems to be the better known of the two. Locally he was also responsible for the Phillips Vestry of the First Congregational Church and a house for Daniel W. Tenney at the corner of Broadway and Pleasant Street.


Tenney had begun developing his estate, building walls and opening roads in 1882. In the next several years, the roads were macadamized, ponds built, ornamental trees planted. Additional property was acquired for the estate, which eventually totaled 75 acres. The name Fair View Park and Grey Court, begun in 1890 was completed three years later. The gate house is the only structure of the extensive estate to survive intact and can be seen in many of the historic photographs of Grey Court.


This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: Searles High School

Address: 41 Pleasant Street

Date: 1904

History: The Searles High School was built in 1904 for the Town of Methuen by local millionaire and community benefactor Edward F. Searles. It was designed by Henry Vaughan who also responsible for other Searles commissions such as the Serlo Organ Hall (1899-1909), the Central School (1904), All Saints Episcopal Church (1904), and the Railroad Station (1908). The building remained a High School until it was replaced by the new Tenney High School in 1952. It became an elementary school until 1975 and school department offices until 1983. The building was then sold to the Bergmeyer Development Company. They developed the building for office space, opening in 1986. In 1992, the building was repurchased by the town for possible use as a town hall.

This building possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: Tenney Middle School

Address: 75 Pleasant Street

Date: 1951

History: The 75 acre Tenney estate remained in the family from the early 1880s to 1951. In 1951, the estate of Daniel G. Tenney gave 26 acres to the town for the Tenney High School, and later sold the remainder of the site to the Basilican Salvatorian Order of the Melkite Rite, putting the money in trust for Tenney High School graduates. St. Basil's Seminary and Chapel was built near the old Tenney stable in 1960 and Grey Court, which burned in 1978 was demolished in 1985. A few ruins mark the site of Grey court, but the Tenney legacy of commitment to the community had remained. Tenney's was one of three great turn-of-the-century estates in Methuen, along with those of Edward F. Searles, and David Nevins.


Ground breaking for the new school took place on March 26, 1952, with the contract given to Bossi Construction, Inc. of Boston. The corner stone was laid on July 20, 1950 in a ceremony with Judge Louis S. Cox as the speaker. Dedication of the school, which cost $1,552,955 to build, took place on December 15, 1953. The Tenney High School as it was first known is now the Tenney Middle School.






Name:

Address: 172 Pleasant Street

Date: c. 1872

History: The earliest documentation of a house in the approximate location of 172 Pleasant appears on the 1872 atlas owned by Parry. A subsequent owner may have been C. Whiteley. By 1885, the owner was John H. George, a farmer, who in 1901 was also a selectman. At that time, the house was numbered 98 Pleasant (changed to 172 in the 1930s). George died October 28, 1903. Subsequent occupants of the house included George H. Richardson (1914), an insurance agent; John Hunarian (1920s and 30s), an operative and later a chauffeur; Rafael Hunarian (1935), a chauffeur; and George Bateman (1938), employed at Lawrence Gas &Electric Co.






Name: St. Theresa's Church

Address: 22 Plymouth Street

Date: 1935/36

History: St. Theresa's Church was built in 1935/36 as an offshoot of St. Ann's Catholic Church in Lawrence. Shortly before St. Theresa's was constructed, St. Ann's had built a large orphanage nearby on Haverhill Street. This precipitated the need for a local Catholic church in this section of Methuen. In addition, the number of families belonging to St. Ann's had risen to 3,000 and as many of the families moved out of Lawrence and into nearby Methuen where they required a place to worship. St. Theresa's is one of three churches associated with St. Ann's; the others are Mt. Carmel Church (1913) on Union Street in Methuen and Sacred Heart (1906) in Lawrence. All these churches were known as "national" churches because they served a particular ethnic group. In this case, the French Canadians. The churches are staffed by the Marist Priests who, until the mid-twentieth century, said masses in French. The church was designed by architect J.G. Morisette, about whom little is known.






Name: St. Theresa's Church Rectory

Address: 22 Plymouth Street

Date: 1935/36

History: This is the parish house for the adjacent St. Theresa's Catholic Church which was built in 1936 to serve the growing French Canadian community in the west end of Methuen. The land, formerly called Glen Forest Park, was purchased in 1922, and the corner stone for the church was laid June 2, 1935. The parish house was built shortly after to house the Marist priests who staff the church. It is still in use today.






Name: Terence Dolan House

Address: 478 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1900

History: Adjacent to the Fair Oaks Addition, this Georgian Revival residence reflects the styles and materials of many houses built in the Fair Oaks area, one of many turn-of-the-century Methuen subdivisions, but distinguished by large, high-styled houses. Terence Dolan, the original owner, was a mason. Characteristically, houses in the Fair Oaks subdivision appealed to Lawrence "commuters" as well as merchants and professionals in Methuen. It possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 491 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1900

History: 491 Prospect Street is significant as a fine example of the Shingle Style, and as representative of houses built for Lawrence and Methuen businessmen in Methuen subdivisions after the turn of the century. Fair Oaks, in which this residence is located, was developed by members of the J. D. McAllister family of Methuen.


It possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name:

Address: 526 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1840

History: This building is significant as a well preserved example of a Greek Revival dwelling in one of the earlier settled areas of Methuen, Near the site of the first meeting house. Once in agricultural use, the first residents here likely were farmers who supplied produce to Lowell and Lawrence.

It possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: J. E. Buswell House

Address: 535-537 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1875

History: This building is significant as a well preserved businessman's and state representative's residence, and characteristic of the Prospect/Brook Street residential are. Additionally, it is the finest example of Second Empire design remaining in the town.

It possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.






Name: James E. Simpson House

Address: 606 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1920

History: This building is significant as a well preserved Craftsman Style bungalow associated historically with the development of single-family subdivision in the first decades of the 20th century. Subdivision of surrounding farmland along Prospect Street did not occur until after the introduction of streetcars at the turn of the century. The 1725 town pound originally stood on the corner of this property and the 1726 first meeting house was located across the street.


It possesses integrity of location, design, setting, materials and workmanship, and meets the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places.




Name: Asie Swan House

Address: 669 Prospect Street

Date: c. 1720 

History: Prior to the construction of a meeting house on "Meeting House Hill" in 1727, the Asie Swan House was used for Methuen's first town meetings, commencing in 1726. The house was moved to its present location from its original site near Prospect Hill, now part of Lawrence. It is significant for its association with Methuen's early period of settlement, when there was no nucleated town center, and for its association with Methuen's early town meeting history.


A second story was added in the 1980's.






Name:

Address: 96-98 Railroad Street

Date: 1870s

History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.


In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.





Name:

Address: 100-102 Railroad Street

Date: 1870s

History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.


In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.





Name:

Address: 104-106 Railroad Street

Date: 1870s

History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.


In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.






Name: Joseph H. Pearl House

Address: 110-112 Railroad Street

Date: 1895

History: The 1885 Directory lists Joseph H. Pearl, wood, teaming, jobbing, house Pearl Place, (later Pearl Court). In 1895 Pearl is taxed for 1 house on Pearl Court and l new house on Railroad Street valued at $2200. Pearl maintained his residence on Pearl Court and rented the Railroad Street house.






Name: Antrim/Perkins House

Address: 114-120 Railroad Street

Date:

History: The construction date and the original owner of this house are not known. The 1872 map shows a house on this site which is identified as belonging to the White Estate, but this could not be confirmed by the assessor's records. In 1883 it was purchased by Esther Antrim and in 1891 by Annie Perkins.






Name: Riverside Auto Body

Address: 9 River Street

Date: 1951,additions in 1961, 1962, and 1965

History: The building now called Riverside Auto Body was built in 1951 as a two bay gas station with additions in 1961, 1962, and 1965. The second storage building (see form) appears to have been constructed in 1965.






Name: VFW Post

Address: 26 River Street

Date: 1959

History: The Veteran's of Foreign Wars post house is located at 26 River Street. A permit was taken out for construction of the post in 1959.






Name: Methuen Mill Agent's House

Address: 30 River Street

Date: c. 1830/64

History: According to reminiscences by William Barnes published in the Methuen Transcript in 1905, 30 River Street was owned and occupied by Esquire Tenney in 1845. John Tenney is said to have been the first lawyer in town. He was also a Justice of the Peace. The Vital Records list the marriage of John Tenney and Mary Augusta Bartlett of Haverhill, on Sept 19, 1830. In 1831 Tenney purchased 8 acres of land with buildings from Daniel Balch for $700 . Tenney died in 1853 leaving his wife, Augusta, and John Davis as trustees of his estate. Augusta had "right of possession" of the homestead until her death. In 1858 she deeded the house to John Davis and in 1865 he sold it to the Methuen Company

David Nevins acquired Methuen Company in 1864. On the 1872 map the house is shown belonging to D. Nevins and on subsequent maps to The Methuen Company. It is variously referred to as the agent's house. Lewis E. Barnes, superintendent of The Methuen Company and his wife Carrie Richardson Barnes who he married in 1890, lived for many years in the agent's house at 30 River Street, shown in Town of Methuen Pictorial Souvenir (1903).



Last Updated 8/22/08

 


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