Name:

Address: 96-98 Railroad Street

Date: 1870s

History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.

In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.

  Name:

 Address: 100-102 Railroad Street

 Date: 1870s

 History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.

In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.

  Name:

 Address: 104-106 Railroad Street

 Date: 1870s

 History: The Methuen Company (see 47 Osgood St.) was purchased in 1864 by David Nevins, a prominent Boston investor who subsequently settled in Methuen. Under his leadership, it quadrupled in size in the years between 1870 and 1881, creating a need for mill operatives' housing. By the 1870s, double houses, which can be seen on the 1884 map, lined Pine Street on both side. The earliest ones, which appear before 1872, remain on the left side, outside of the historic district. With the exception of the house at 1 Pine Street, houses from the right side have all been demolished or moved. However, houses owned by the Methuen Company which are shown at 96-98, 100-102, 104-106 Railroad Street by 1892 (and not before), and at 10-12, 14-16, 18-20 Lowell Street by 1911 (and not before), match the remaining Pine Street houses in form and detail and are presumed to be the Pine Street houses.

In 1882, before removal of the Methuen Company houses to Railroad Street, David Nevins had moved the old Congregational Church Vestry to Railroad Street for use as the Mission School. (The Philips Chapel, dedicated in the same year, had replaced the old, wooden vestry.) The Mission School was begun as a department of Congregational Sunday School in about 1875 by a Mrs. Chase. During the time the school was located on Railroad Street it was supervised by J. Calvin Taylor. When the Pine Street houses were moved to Railroad Street, the school building was moved to the back of the lot, and by 1896 it has disappeared from the map.

  Name: Joseph H. Pearl House

 Address: 110-112 Railroad Street

 Date: 1895

 History: The 1885 Directory lists Joseph H. Pearl, wood, teaming, jobbing, house Pearl Place, (later Pearl Court). In 1895 Pearl is taxed for 1 house on Pearl Court and l new house on Railroad Street valued at $2200. Pearl maintained his residence on Pearl Court and rented the Railroad Street house.

  Name: Antrim/Perkins House

 Address: 114-120 Railroad Street

 Date:

 History: The construction date and the original owner of this house are not known. The 1872 map shows a house on this site which is identified as belonging to the White Estate, but this could not be confirmed by the assessor's records. In 1883 it was purchased by Esther Antrim and in 1891 by Annie Perkins.

  Name: Riverside Auto Body

 Address: 9 River Street

 Date: 1951,additions in 1961, 1962, and 1965

 History: The building now called Riverside Auto Body was built in 1951 as a two bay gas station with additions in 1961, 1962, and 1965. The second storage building (see form) appears to have been constructed in 1965.


Name: VFW Post

 Address: 26 River Street

 Date: 1959

 History: The Veteran's of Foreign Wars post house is located at 26 River Street. A permit was taken out for construction of the post in 1959.


Name: Methuen Mill Agent's House

 Address: 30 River Street

 Date: c. 1830/64

 History: According to reminiscences by William Barnes published in the Methuen Transcript in 1905, 30 River Street was owned and occupied by Esquire Tenney in 1845. John Tenney is said to have been the first lawyer in town. He was also a Justice of the Peace. The Vital Records list the marriage of John Tenney and Mary Augusta Bartlett of Haverhill, on Sept 19, 1830. In 1831 Tenney purchased 8 acres of land with buildings from Daniel Balch for $700 . Tenney died in 1853 leaving his wife, Augusta, and John Davis as trustees of his estate. Augusta had "right of possession" of the homestead until her death. In 1858 she deeded the house to John Davis and in 1865 he sold it to the Methuen Company

David Nevins acquired Methuen Company in 1864. On the 1872 map the house is shown belonging to D. Nevins and on subsequent maps to The Methuen Company. It is variously referred to as the agent's house. Lewis E. Barnes, superintendent of The Methuen Company and his wife Carrie Richardson Barnes who he married in 1890, lived for many years in the agent's house at 30 River Street, shown in Town of Methuen Pictorial Souvenir (1903).


Name:

Address: 57 Salem Street

Date: c. 1856

History: The earliest map on which 57 Salem Street (then called Mill Street) definitely appears is for the year 1872, but it is likely that the building was on the site in as early as 1856 but the map for that year is not clear. G.P. Poor owned the house in 1872, but by 1884 it had been sold to John Boardman, a farmer. In the early 20th century, the house (then known as 55 Salem Street) was owned and occupied by John W. Hall, who was also a farmer. Beginning around 1918 with the development of Methuen's Armenian community, the Hovnaton Depoian family occupied the house for at least thirty-two years, and continued to farm the land into the late 1920s. Over the years, Depoian shared the residence with Hovnasvanus Ajskarian (farmer), Hovanes Apkarian (operative), John Apkarian and Jacob Demerjian. In 1950, the property, still numbered 55 Salem Street, was the residence of Katherine Depoian.


Name: Tyler Street Church

 Address: Tyler Street

 Date: 1916

 History: Built on land given to the Primitive Methodist Society by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Redford, this small church building was erected in 1916, and its interior was completed in 1917. It was designed by architect L. Firth. William D. Hartshorne laid the corner stone. The Society incorporated as an independent church in 1922 becoming the Third Primitive Methodist Church in Methuen, serving the western part of town. In more recent years it was converted to a residence (ca. 1970s).

  Name:

 Address: 169 Tyler Street

 Date:

 History: As early as 1806 there were two houses in this approximate location belonging to the Messer family. Although the existing buildings appear to largely date from a later time, it is possible that portions of early 19th century houses could be contained within the existing structures. By 1846, what is today the main house was owned by James Messer while the one to the east was owned by Benjamin Farrington. The same was the case in 1856. By 1884 the property was owned by G.O. Messer, who is listed in town directories as a farmer. Between 1885 and 1901 the farm was acquired by William J. Leach; directory research indicates that Leach lived in one house while the other was occupied by Bagdasar Boornasian, a farmer and milk dealer, roughly between the years 1901 to 1905. By 1914 the directories list only Nasham Boornasian (farmer and milk dealer) at this address. By 1929 the occupant is listed as Nasham Hovanasian (farmer); this remains the same until at least 1950 when he is listed as a poultry farmer.

  Name:

 Address: 179 Tyler Street

 Date: c. 1766

 History: According to the 1978 Methuen survey, 179 Tyler Street was built in 1766. Map research into the early history of the house reveals that a building was on the site as early as 1806, when it was owned by the Whittier family. By 1846, ownership was in the hands of Moses Smith, who owned it until at least 1872. In 1884, the owner was J. Foster, who was listed in the 1885 city directory as a heel manufacturer living on Tyler Street (known then as Plum Street). Joel was followed by Alice J. Foster, who lived on Tyler Street until at least 1906. The next occupant was Hercules S. Moore, a contractor and later a mason, who lived at 179 Tyler c. 1914-1921. John Arakelian, a farmer, lived in the house from at least 1924 to 1936.

  Name:

 Address: 191 Tyler Street

 Date: c. 1906

 History: 191 Tyler Street was built between 1906 and 1914. In 1906, it was not yet on the town maps, but by 1914 the city directory listed it as the residence of Henry J. Harris, a mill operative. Harris, presumably the first owner, lived there until at least 1936. The house remains a single-family home.


Last Updated 9/4/07

 


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